EWM Attribute Customization Introduction

While working on Debugging EWM Work Item Attribute Customization JavaScript I thought about all the questions I have seen being asked about Attribute Customization on the Jazz.net forum. There are some common questions I have seen a lot. There are some common things users would like to do and there are some limitations that might get into the way. I thought, I would create a blog that summarizes what I know about attribute customization and also provide the important links. I also want to provide a short summary about, for all I know, what can and can not be done with Attribute Customization and the provided API. I already create something like that in RTC Process Customization – What you can and cannot do. I will follow its structure and reuse some content but will try to be more specific in this blog. This blog will be limited to the work item attribute customization, with some few exceptions. The blog post will mention possible solutions that go beyond attribute customization, where this seems reasonable.

Important links

The following links are the most important references about EWM work item configuration and attribute customization.

About Jazz.net forum questions

A lot of the input that I take under consideration comes from questions and answers on the Jazz.net forum. Some of the examples originate from customer requests.

Questions on Jazz.net and even customer requests do often not provide good requirements. They often provide some implementation idea instead. The real problem or business case is usually hidden and not exposed. So it is important to question the request to drill down and expose why the question was asked as it is and what the background of the question is. If the real reason for the question is exposed, the answer can be completely different.

One example is: “Can I auto subscribe users to a work item?”. In pretty much all cases I can remember, the purpose of this was to send an e-mail notification to a user e.g. when the work item was created. Adding a user to the subscribers might or might not be a viable solution, but the example clearly exposes the problem.

So take the questions on Jazz.net with a grain on salt and try to dig deeper to understand what the question is really about.

What is Process Configuration and Attribute Customization?

EWM allows to configure the process of a project area. There are several options that can be used.

  1. Work items, work item attributes, editor presentations, workflows can be configured.
  2. Roles can be configured
  3. Permissions can be configured
  4. Operational behavior can be configured using out of the box preconditions and follow up actions.

Attribute Customization is a work item related capability provided by EWM. It provides built-in capabilities that can be configured and thus be considered process configuration as mentioned above.

The capability types available for configuration are:

  1. Default value provider for built in attribute types.
  2. Calculated value provider to support calculation with work item attributes to support certain processes.
  3. Value Sets to provide customized sets of selectable values for work item attributes. Built in value sets allow to extract string values from an XML page in the Web, select contributors by role and allow to select enumeration vales based on other dependent enumerations.
  4. Validators to validate values of attributes based on range or regular expressions. Validators can show a warning in the UI and be used with a built in advisor to prevent saving a work item, unless the offending attribute values are corrected.
  5. Conditions can be used with built in advisors to make work item attributes read-only or required. There is no built in condition available at this time.

What is special about Attribute Customization?

What sets attribute customization apart from the other capabilities is, that it provides a JavaScript API that allows to create custom scripts for provider configurations. The JavaScript can be uploaded to the project areas process by any user with the required permission. This does not require write access to the application servers file system. For this reason it is possible to create and deploy custom JavaScript scripts even if the server is maintained by a cloud provider.

JavaScript is also reasonably easy to learn and a lot of practitioners have some JavaScript skills. This is a two edged sword.

Contrary to Eclipse extension plugins, another extension mechanism available in EWM, the JavaScript API has a relatively low experience threshold for beginners. It is way easier to develop than the other Eclipse plugin based customization options available in EWM that require great skills, understanding of the framework and familiarity with the available API. Since these options are based on Java and Eclipse plugin extension development, they require the plugins to be deployed which means they need to be copied into a file system, typically on the server where the CCM application is deployed. This is usually not possible in a cloud hosted environment. Except, some cloud services would perform such deployments for the customer, for a higher price tier.

The danger is that the low skill cap attracts very inexperienced users, which can eventually lead to issues, including server performance issues. Some of the capabilities can be overused. There is also a tendency to overcomplicate the work item workflow and the process.

The JavaScript Attribute Customization API constraints and limitations

Attribute Customization is configured on the attribute level. This means that any attribute customization will apply to all work item types that have the attribute configured.

JavaScript attribute customization scripts have to implement the required interface for their type. All the interfaces require to return some data. The data can be empty or undefined, dependent on the attribute type, e.g. an empty string or null. It has to return something that matches the attribute type it is configured for, nevertheless.

It is possible to detect the type of the work item the script is executed for, this allows to have different behavior for different work item types in the JavaScript attribute customization script. Based on the work item type attribute value, the script decides what to return, some custom value or the current attribute value to do nothing. This strategy allows to adjust for type specific attribute customization to some extend.

The API description in the Work Items Attribute Customization Wiki page explains which work item attribute value types are supported. Only very basic attribute types such as strings, numbers, enumerations, timestamps and dates are really supported. Especially note that the support for complex item based attribute types such as team areas, contributors etc. is very limited. For a those attributes, all you can access is the UUID and the display name. If you want to set such values, you must return the UUID of the item.

The documented API does not provide with methods to discover information beyond the work items current attribute values. There is no documented simple JavaScript API to discover details about not attribute based information. There is no documented simple API to follow or create links to work items or other artifacts. There is no documented API to access process information, such as users and roles or any other details. There is also no mechanism to detect a state change or workflow action. The workflow action is only available in conditions but the detection of a state change would be desirable in calculated values as well.

The return value of JavaScript attribute customization scripts is processed in the API. Dependent on the work item attribute type, the script is configured for, some kind of conversion is performed. As an example a string can be converted into a timestamp, provided the format is correct.

As far as I can tell, the conversion that is performed for html and string based attributes, including the subject and description, when returned from JavaScript converts the content into a string escaping any special content such as XML or HTML tags. This conversion happens outside of the JavaScript and there is no way to change the behavior. Because of this reason it seems to be impossible to return HTML with working links for HTML or string based attributes including the summary and description. Only the built in configurable default values work correctly. The only current attribute type that can be set by JavaScript attribute customization to contain links is the type Wiki. In this case the Wiki syntax has no XML/HTML tags involved that would have to be escaped.

Performance considerations

Some users seen to think there is such a thing as limitless size and performance. This does not apply to the real world. It is possible to heavily impact the performance of clients or servers with process configuration and especially customization. I am aware of a case, where JavaScript added to a Theme caused so much communication that the browsers on smaller laptops where drained of resources and almost came to a halt. Loading a work item took several minutes. This made working with the tools impossible for many users. So be careful and consider what you might do to the performance.

It is also very easy to annoy the users with overcomplicated processes, thousands of choices, required attributes nobody knows the values for etc. In general big numbers are bad and small numbers are good. When drop down boxes grow too big and the number of items ever increases, the users will be affected in their ability to successfully use the process. I have seen cases where the users got confused and did not realize that they had to enter a value and complained the UI had stopped. Overcomplicated processes will likely cause performance complaints and wear away the will to support the chosen tool and process.

There are limitations in the amount of custom attributes for a work item type (100). Having a lot of work item types is also not helping to make the process easier. Keep numbers low e.g. 10 would be a guidance for work item types.

Also keep in mind that there are size limits for all work item attribute types. Especially note that for list type attributes there is a size limit. How many selections can be stored is limited by the site of the list attributes and the size of the ID’s or item UUID’s that are stored.

Where does the JavaScript run?

The JavaScript runs in the Web Browser or in the EWM Eclipse client in a JavaScript interpreter..

Where and when is Attribute Customization not executing

Attribute customization including the JavaScript is not executed when the work item operations are created using an API such as OSLC or the SDK or Plain Java Client Libraries.

Work Item Proxy

When debugging the JavaScript, it is possible to see more objects accessible to the JavaScript in the debugger. It is possible to see an object called work Item proxy that looks very promising. Please note that this object is considered internal API. It should not be used by the JavaScript. The supported API is documented here. It is also important to understand, that this work item proxy is only available in the Web Browser and not if the script runs in the Eclipse client.

There are several posts on the Jazz.net that discuss how the proxy could be used. Again, it is internal API and should not be used, if you do, you are on your own. There might be unwanted side effects and the internal API could change at any time.

Why does my script not work?

This question comes up often on the forum. It is pretty much impossible to debug others scripts on Jazz.net. There are reasons for that:

  1. Java Script Attribute Customization depends on the process used in the project area. The community does not have and, due to privacy, security and other concerns will not get this.
  2. It is quite some effort to setup a test project area, even if one would have a process template.

So it is usually impossible to help on this level. What can be done is scanning the script and the description in the question for typical issues.

See Debugging EWM Work Item Attribute Customization JavaScript for how you can debug your own scripts.

Please note, there are different levels of issues with JavaScript. On the most fundamental level:

  1. Attachment Scripts must be enabled in the advanced teamserver.properties to be working – see below.
  2. The script must be accessible in the process.
  3. The script files encoding must be UTF-8 and consistent so the file can be read, interpreted and executed.
Process Attachment Scripts enabled.

If an error happens at this level the best you can hope for is an entry in the log file. Only if the JavaScript is successfully decoded and loaded, it can be debugged.

What you can and cannot do with JavaScript Attribute Customization

There are certain limitations in the JavaScript Attribute Customization API as far as I am aware. I provided a more comprehensive presentation here: Process Customization – What you can and cannot do.

I will try to provide some details here.

  1. Attribute Customization JavaScript is always defined as a function. Regardless what type of Attribute Customization the script must return a value (can be null or empty). Otherwise this will be a potential error in the log. I am not sure what happens worst case.
  2. Attribute customization is for the attribute. This means especially that the customization will be executed in all work item types that have the attribute configured.
  3. Sure, in JavaScript, you can get the work item type, by reading the respective attribute. You can then decide what to return. As explained in 1. you cannot return nothing. You however can get the current value of the attribute and return that, this helps in some cases.
  4. As far as I am aware, Attribute Customization only runs in the context of a users browser and the Eclipse client. As explained above, this also means that automation based on attribute customization does not work, if you access work items using any of the APIs. This is important, as pre-conditions/advisors and follow up actions/participants can be implemented as server extensions that always run, regardless who accesses the work item how. When the JavaScript is run in the Eclipse client, only the infrastructure of the Eclipse client is available.
  5. Attribute customization scripts can run multiple times, for example the calculated values might execute multiple times, based on changes to the other attributes they depend on.
  6. JavaScript Attribute Customization only has access to the data of the work item in which context it runs. It is not possible to follow work item links using the documented API.
  7. Even the available data of a work item is limited. As an example, a workflow action for a state change is only available in conditions. It is not available in any other attribute customization types, especially not in calculated values. This essentially means, there is no simple way of tracking and detecting a workflow state change.

Java Eclipse plugin extension based Attribute Customization

Beyond JavaScript, it is possible to provide Java based Work Item Attribute Customization Plugin Extensions. This is possible for all available attribute customization types, default values, calculated values, value sets, conditions and validators as shown in these examples. These Java based plugin extensions have access to more complex EWM Java SDK API. This makes it more feasible to create complex custom attribute customization. It is also easier to control which return result types are supported and, based on these, create richer attribute customization. It would, for example, absolutely be possible to have a default value provider that returns an XML or HTML result, that shows working HTML links. The decision to return a result that escapes the HTML tags or return the correct format is an implementation detail. A more complex example with additional background information can be found here and in this post.

The Java based attribute customizations would show up in the Admin UI in the same way the built in Attribute customization does. To make this possible the Java based Eclipse plugins need to be deployed in the Eclipse client as well as the EWM Server (see here). The API that is available to the Eclipse client and the server is the EWM Common SDK API. Consider reading this blog post to better understand what this means. The requirement to deploy these extensions on the EWM server are a potential inhibitor for cloud based deployments.

EWM Eclipse Plugin Extensibility

Java base attribute customization is only a subset of the Java Eclipse plugin extensibility available in EWM. The SDK provided for EWM allows to develop all kinds of extensions, including pre-conditions, follow up actions and asynchronous tasks. It is possible to develop such extensions to run in the context of the Eclipse client or on the server. These extensions need to be deployed in the context they are developed for. Server extensions have access to the full capabilities of the EWM Common SDK API and the EWM Server SDK API.

Preconditions also called Advisors can act as process advisors that prevent saving if the data violates some standards. Preconditions can be used to implement attribute customization validators or conditions. Example Advisors can be found here.

Follow up actions, also called Participants can perform additional operations on the EWM data. As an example, follow up actions can collect data across linked artefacts, perform calculations on the data, set attributes and properties for items and save the changes. Example participants can be found here. This includes the capability to create new work items and link the new work items to other work items.

In some cases it is better to use these capabilities instead of attribute customization, because it provides more API than even the Java based attribute customization.

All plugin based solutions require to be deployed. Server extensions require to be deployed in the server, which might be a blocker in an environment hosted as a service in the cloud.

Popular requests

In the next sections, I will try to provide some examples of popular requests. I will describe the background these request have, as far as I can tell, and which implementation options might be viable.

Popular: Custom E-Mail Notification

This comes up in various flavors. Examples are

  1. Can I automatically set an owner of a work item?
  2. Can I automatically subscribe a user to a work item?

With respect to attribute customization, the answer would be yes, you can do this, to some extent. It is possible to set or add a subscriber, to set or add a work item owner. In the JavaScript API this needs to be done the contributors UUID. The UUID will have to be configured or hard coded when using the JavaScript API. There is no API to search for contributors in JavaScript.

A Java based attribute customization plugin would have more API access and can provide better control and automation.

A real custom mail notification is possible using the following approaches

  1. Custom scheduled asynchronous tasks (see Due Date Notifier).
  2. Custom follow up actions that trigger at work item save.

The last three options require to write custom Java extension plugins and their deployment on the application server, which makes it less attractive in a cloud environment.

As an alternative, EWM has other mechanism that might be better suited. For example there are RSS feeds for various change events, work item queries and dashboards. These do not send e-mail, but they might scale better than e-mail notifications.

Keep in mind that the e-mail notification options are controlled at user level by the user. A real Java Eclipse plugin that sends custom e-mail notifications could work without the need to be correctly configured at user level.

Popular: Calculation with work item attributes

This is often requested to calculate effort or something similar.

With respect to JavaScript based attribute customization, it is possible to perform calculations on attributes of the same work item. It is possible to perform numerical, boolean and other operations in calculated values. It is necessary to set the dependencies right, so that the chain of events executes until all the calculations have been performed. If multiple work item attributes need to be set, keep in mind, that the calculated value is a function that only works for one work item attribute. If multiple attributes need to be set, a calculation for each attribute is necessary. As already mentioned, It is not possible to calculate across values of multiple work items.

If it is necessary to calculate across multiple work items, JavaScript attribute customization does not work. It is necessary to use the Java plugin extension mechanisms such as follow up actions to implement this. An example is the RTC Update Parent Duration Estimation and Effort Participant.

It is also possible to use external tools based on API to collect data and then update work items e.g. in scheduled jobs.

Popular: Calculate how Often a work item was in a specific state

I have seen this several times. There is no easy way to detect work item changes. It might be possible to use an approach as shown below to detect this, but I am not sure if this idea below would really work.

With some tricks and several hidden custom attributes for state tracking ST1, ST2 and counting STC, it might be possible to cobble something together. E.g. initialize the hidden state tracking attributes st1 and st2 with a default based on the state ‘New’.

The calculated value of ST1 is triggered and calculated based on the current value of the work item state attribute. If the current state is not the value of ST1 return the new current value.

Calculate the counter based on a triggered change of ST1. If ST1 contains the desired state, return the current value of STC increased by one.

Calculate the value of ST2 when ST1 was changed. Return the value of ST1 as result to the calculated value.

This requires some intelligent usage of the dependent attributes. It might be necessary to use more artificial attributes to get this working. This attempt has however many downsides, especially the custom attributes are all showing up in the history and also create more changes in the work item.

It would be easier to develop a follow up action that actually works on the state change, if this is necessary. It would be important to see if reporting can be used instead.

Popular: Make work item attributes read-only or required

EWM has preconditions/Advisors to make work item attributes read only or required based on conditions. The question is, how far can you go with this? The JavaScript API is very limited in what data is available. It is obvious that conditions can work on this data. So you can make attributes read only or required on work item attribute information.

But since you have no access to any complex information such as team membership or roles or the current contributor, JavaScript can not be used to create more complex conditions. Any condition that needs to have access to more complex information, would require to be written as Java plugin. An example requested by a customer with additional background information can be found here and in this post. It is important to know that these condition based attribute customizations are the only way to customize rules to make attributes read-only or required. There is no other extension point available that you could use to hook into. This is one of the rare cases where custom preconditions/Advisors can not be used.

In my experience with requests like here and in this post, to make attributes required or read only, are often motivated by the desire to have more fine grained control. Consider to use permissions to prevent roles from changing attributes.

Requests like above are also often motivated by the desire to make EWM work like some legacy tool. My experience so far has always been, that trying to make a tool work against its design is usually fatal. It usually makes the process hard to understand and follow. It also often degrades usability and performance.

Since every user in EWM has at least the default role (Everyone), can have many roles, and the roles have an order, it is also debatable what ‘by role’ really means.

Popular: Dynamically Hiding Work Item Attributes

I have also seen several requests that want to make attributes hidden by some complex, usually role based rule. This is not possible today, regardless the approach.

There are very limited capabilities to control visibility built into EWM. Attributes can be hidden if they are empty, if the work item is in a workflow state, if some endpoint is empty, if there is no project link and if the work item is just created. An editor presentation tab can be hidden, if all contained attribute presentations are empty.

There is no extension point, and there is no attribute customization available, I am aware of, that would allow customize the behavior in any other way.

There are various enhancement requests for EWM in this context. I think it would be nice if there was a custom attribute customization option that could be used with a precondition e.g. ‘Hide for condition’ that could be used similar to ‘Read only for condition’. This would allow to hide attributes that are unimportant. The question is, if it is helpful when attributes show up and vanish for the same attribute type. This is at least debatable. As a user I would likely find this confusing. As always, keep in mind this could open the door for performance issues and abuse. The remark about roles and their usage in EWM also applies.

Please note, just because an attribute is not visible in the work item editor, presentation does not make it inaccessible by work item queries or reports. EWM was also designed for collaboration and not hiding.

Popular: Dynamic workflow

I don’t know where this comes from. I doubt this is a thing in other tools for change tracking, but it cam up more than once.

EWM/RTC does not support dynamically changing the workflow of an instance of a work item. The workflow is tied to the work item type. It would be possible to use a follow up action/Participant to change the work item type under certain circumstances. Due to the lack of support for detecting a state change and the lack of access to other data in attribute customization, it would be not feasible to use attribute customization. A participant is a far better option.

Popular: Dynamic creation of attributes

This came up several times.EWM does not officially support this. It is possible to create an attribute using the API, but this attribute does not surface in the admin UI. It is necessary to add statements to the process XML to make such an attribute configurable in the process and the editor presentations.

This is used by some integrations just once and not meant to be used constantly during operations. Also mind the limit of custom attributes and consider usability of the process.

Restrict Read Access To Data

Some customers want to have more control about who can access which data. EWM has the capability to restrict work item and SCM item read access permission based on access context. If an item can not be read, it can also not be written.

For work items, the restricted access context can be an access group, project area, or team area. It is possible to automate setting the work items restricted access based on categories. This sets the access context to the process area associated with the work item category. This is the only built in automation for category based work item access control. There is no other built in automation for work items e.g. enabling the automatic selection of an access group for the work item.

For SCM data there are more options to set the access context/visibility. Components can have access control set to a project area or an access groups. SCM content in a component, folders, files, can be configured more fine grained. It is possible to limit access to a contributor, a project or team area or an access group. There is no built in automation to set the access context for SCM items.

It is possible to create custom automation to set the access context for work items and SCM items. One implementation approach is using follow up actions. For work item restricted access this can be configured for the work item save operation. For SCM objects follow up actions for the check in and deliver operation could be developed to compute the desired access context. I have explained some of the options in the blog series Setting Access Control Permissions for SCM Versionables.

In contrast to my knowledge back then, I know today, that it is possible to elevate the operation context to an administrator, why this is important is explained in the second last paragraph.

The question would be, can JavaScript attribute customization be used for custom automation for the restricted access? Attribute customization is only available for work items. There is no such API for SCM content. It might be possible to set the restricted access attribute in JavaScript attribute customization by returning the UUID of the access context, but as already mentioned, because of the very limited amount of data and API access available, JavaScript would most likely not be feasible for anything beyond that.

Java Based attribute customization could be more feasible, but it is most likely not possible to elevate the operation to super user access due to the limitation of the available API to the common API. I would consider this approach to be unfeasible for any relevant complexity.

If it is necessary to develop a Java Eclipse plugin for attribute customization anyway, it looks to be more suitable to create a follow up action to automate setting the access context. This allows to use the full capabilities of the EWM SDK common and server API and it is possible to elevate the operation to run in an administrator/super user context.

The reason why it would it beneficial to run the operation in an administrator context is, that the operational behavior usually runs with the permissions and limitations of the user that performs the save operation. This also means the operation fails, if the permissions are preventing it. This limits what can be done. For example it is impossible to change the access context of an item in a way that makes it inaccessible to the user performing the operation. The operation would fail. Elevating the operation to run in an administrator context, would allow such an operation to be successfully executed, regardless of the repository access and permissions of the regular user triggering the operation.

I would suggest to not try to use attribute customization for these use cases.

Summary

As a summary, attribute customization, especially using JavaScript can be used for some interesting purposes. There are however a lot of limitations in the JavaScript API that prevent several use cases. The biggest benefit is, that it can be used without having to deploy anything on a server. This allows it to be used in cloud deployments, where the users have no access to the server file system.

For more complex problems, the Eclipse plugin Extensibility is a better option, regardless if it is the Java based attribute customization, or Eclipse plugin based EWM extensions, just because the APIs provided in the EWM SDK are so much richer.

This was quite some effort. As always, I hope that this is useful to someone out there.

Advertisement

Debugging EWM Work Item Attribute Customization JavaScript

I don’t know why I have delayed this post for so long. Anyway, I am working on some workshop material and part of the workshop is RTC/EWM Work Item Attribute Customization using some simple JavaScript scripts. I often see questions about this type of attribute customization on the Jazz.net forum. Since it is pretty much impossible to remote debug scripts for others for various reasons, I want to provide some short introduction how anyone can use the built in Developer Tools of a Firefox or Chrome browser to debug the scripts.

Open the Project Area

Pick a browser. The latest Chrome or Firefox will do. Open the project area in the browser.

Debug mode

The JavaScript code is compressed when it is executed in the browser. To be able to see the scripts code as it is executed, it is necessary to enable the debug mode. This is done by injecting

?debug=true

into the URL used to access the CCM application. For example access the Work Items menu of the project area that has the attribute customization. Into the resulting URI below

https://elm.example.com:9443/ccm/web/projects/JKE%20Banking%20(Change%20Management)#action=com.ibm.team.workitem.viewWelcome

Inject ?debug=true in front of the hash # like so:

https://elm.example.com:9443/ccm/web/projects/JKE%20Banking%20(Change%20Management)?debug=true#action=com.ibm.team.workitem.viewWelcome

Make sure the page loads and the injected code is still showing in the URL.

Note: do not confuse ?debug=true with ?internal=true, which is for a completely different purpose (see the EWM Extensions Workshop the deployment lab).

Find the Scripts in Chrome

Once you have done that, open a context where the scripts would be available. For example create a work item of the specific type of interest that has the attributes.

For Chrome use the three vertical dot menu close to the profile, navigate to the More tools menu and then select the Developer tools menu.

The shortcut is CTRL+Shift+I.

The Developer tools can dock in different locations. You can control where you want it to be docked using the Developer Tools Dock side settings.

I have found the scripts in different locations over the years, at least I believe so. I really used to struggle to find them in Firefox. In Chrome it was really easy to spot, at least in my environment which made it my go-to debugging browser. This location has recently changed for some reason unknown to me. But this time I was able to locate the scripts in the folder top/<publicURIroot>/ccm/web/projects.

To locate the scripts select Sources and select Page if necessary. Then expand the folders until the scripts become available in the folder top/<publicURIroot>/ccm/web/projects. Where <publicURIroot> is the public URI root of you ELM server, that is encoded in the first section of the URL you have open just now.

Click on the script you want to debug. The script opens in the editor and allows you to set breakpoints as shown in the image below.

This now allows you to step through the script and debug as well as inspect the code and the current values in the script instance. The next image shows the debugger pausing at a breakpoint of the script and the how to inspect the value of the parameter attributeId.

You can step over the script statement by statement and the debugger displays the values and call results in the debugger. This makes it as easy as it can get to understand what the script is doing and why (or why not).

Find the Scripts in Firefox

Open Firefox and open the project area you are interested in. Modify the URL like above with the ?debug=true statement. Navigate to the Work Item tab of the project area.

Open the application menu (three horizontal stripes on top of each other). Select More Tools and then select Web Developer Tools

The shortcut is also CTRL+Shift+I. You can control where the Web Developer Tools dock using the customization menu.

Dock the Web Developer Tools as you please. Then open the Debugger tab.

Unfold the nodes MainThread/<publicURIroot>/ccm/web/projects. Where <publicURIroot> is the same public URI root that we know and love.

Click at the script you are interested in to open it in the debugger. Place breakpoints as desired. This works exactly like it does in Chrome.

Create a new work item or open one with scripts you want to debug and use the Web Developer tools similar to the Chrome developer tools.

Possible Issues

You might run into issued if you try this. E.g. the projects folder does not contain any scripts. This can be the result of various reasons. Here what I have run into.

  1. Did you enable Attchment Scripts in the Advanced Properties of the CCM server?
  2. Check by using a default filled in example script. Maybe your script is too corrupted/wrong to be loaded. You might want to consider to check the log file if there are load issues.
  3. If you just changed the scripts and still see the old version, make sure to force a reload e.g. Using STRG+F5 or otherwise reloading the page to pick up the new process.

Summary

I am at a loss, why I have not published this so far. Better late than never, this is going to be my URL for questions in the future.

I hope this helps users out there to smooth their development for attribute customization scripts.